Featured Video Play Icon

Getting Started With Keto

Friends, this post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase via one of these links, I get paid a small commission which I use to cover the costs of operating my website and—if I’m lucky—to buy grass-fed butter for the coffee of my friends that otherwise couldn’t afford it.


Confession: I’m something of a nutrition nerd. I find great joy in experimenting with different diets, macronutrient silliness, supplementation—primarily to see what effect is has on physical and cognitive performance. My friends frequently joke about all of the “dirt flavored” food I eat. Sometimes these experiments are successful, sometimes they’re a wash, and sometimes they’re a complete bust. Like that time I ate only tacos for a month.

I began studying ketogenic eating after years of hearing stories from friends—mostly endurance athletes and high-performing entrepreneurs—about their success using it to hit race weight, fuel through incredibly long events, and to boost brain function. A multi-year stint in CrossFit predating my running career had the concept of “fat-adaptation” on my radar, but it was something that most folks I had interacted with simply didn’t understand. I decided to double down and run my own experiment.

After 45 days of eating around 20 grams of carbs and 100 grams of fat per day, I had dropped twenty-five pounds of fat. My runs were getting faster, my brain was on fire, and I had more energy than I had in years. For the first time in my life, I was developing a visible six-pack.

Continue reading →
A dozen homemade biscuits in a box.

Eating Healthy on the Road

Crossfitters are fond of saying, “you can’t exercise your way out of a bad diet.” Regardless of what you might think about Crossfit, they’re right. Sure, you can work out enough to justify an absurd number of calories, but this still doesn’t make all those donuts you ate on the way to work healthy. In fact, all that sugar is probably wreaking havoc on your training. Not to mention your pancreas, brain, adrenals, abdominals, genitals, and wallet.

Intrepid travelers already know how tough it can be to eat healthy on the go. Air travel and hotels are like a black hole, junk food supergravity drawing you slowly into a singular abyss. Traveling light and border crossings make carrying food a logistical challenge, sometimes impossibility. Pair that with the lack of cooking options in most hotels, and it’s easy to go completely rogue. Even a cheapo butane camp stove and a styrofoam cooler are big luxuries when all you have is a motel-grade Keurig and a microwave.

Continue reading →